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Anti-Objection: 8 Best Techniques

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Posted by: Tatyana Koneva | Source: Vedomosti

Business is built on compromises. Any situation in which the interests of two or more parties are affected requires attention and readiness to adapt their proposal taking into account the needs of other participants. Only in this case can we count on success. However, even the most experienced negotiators rarely succeed in completely avoiding the interlocutor’s resistance. Whether it’s about the need to convince the interlocutor to support your proposal, agree to the terms and conditions or simply make a purchase, it is likely that you will encounter objections.

Are there any ways to overcome them? Of course there is. We need to learn how to build a dialogue with the interlocutor and treat his objections as positive information that simplifies negotiations. How to achieve this? Take a special training on negotiation skills, or try to follow some simple recommendations.

Nothing personal

It is better to set yourself up in such a way as not to experience psychological discomfort when responding to objections. It is important to be able to separate the objection of the interlocutor from his personal relationship to you. Remember that the statements of your vis-a-vis, no matter how harsh they may be, in the vast majority of cases do not apply to you personally - they are addressed to the person in whose role you are playing the seller of a product or idea. Just tell yourself that in your place could be any other, which means that you should not transfer all the negativity to yourself.

The main principle of successful work with objections is “nothing personal”. It is relevant for everyone who wants to convince their interlocutor to buy something, to act in one way or another, to support a proposal or idea.

Appreciate objections

Objections can be either a manifestation of the real concern of the other side with the details of your proposal (price, terms, conditions of implementation), or nit-picking, masking the absence of a specific need (for example, if a person has not yet decided and considers your proposal as a fallback).

Real objections are those important reasons that prompt the interlocutor to refuse to cooperate. Such objections are useful because they signal that the interlocutor is worried. They allow you to better manage the negotiation process.

Real objections can be either a consequence of a misunderstanding, or a signal that your ideas do not coincide with the expectations of the other side.

In both cases, objections are relatively easy to overcome.

Criterias of choice

For successful promotion of an idea, it is necessary to understand as early as possible what criteria your interlocutor is guided by, what is most important for him, and what he could have given up in principle. This is best done as a preventative measure to minimize objection.

Get open

It is important that the person you talk to openly express their doubts. Some of them may well turn out to be far-fetched: people tend to refer, say, to the complexity of implementing a project when they don’t intend to start implementing it at all or are not sure that they are making the right choice.

In this case, the best way to negotiate is to move from discussing the difficulties of implementation to a completely different topic. For example, ask an abstract or clarifying question: “I see that besides how and who will do it, is there something else bothering you?” Only in this way can you analyze all the interlocutor’s doubts and choose from them the key one, with which to work. The easiest way to do this is by prioritizing: “You have voiced several points that bother you, and which of these is the most significant for you?” Usually people call really significant objections.

Pay objection to the question

It is important to remember that behind any objection is the undetected need of the other side for the idea that you are selling. Objecting, your interlocutor often asks for additional information: “Your delivery time doesn’t suit me” may mean “How realistic is this to be done faster?”.

Your task is to correctly respond to the doubts of the interlocutor: to establish the real reasons for the objections and to work with them. Win the dispute - lose the buyer, manage to raise an objection to the question - get a chance to convey to the interlocutor the necessary information and dispel his doubts.

Once you understand which of the objections are real, what is most worrying about your interlocutor, and what criteria he is guided by, you can make the most effective presentation of your idea or revise the conditions of your proposal in such a way that they suit both sides.

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